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#1 Crimson Lego

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 08:49 PM

Anyone know any good mystery books/authors? I'm thinking about taking a break from law and science fiction for awhile, try something new.

#2 Emiko

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 09:01 PM

Read Level 26 by Anthony Zuiker. I couldn't put it down... :D it is also a digi novel...where you can go to a link and watch a small video that goes along with the chapter.

Another good author is (well group) Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child... their book The Relic was once made into a movie...but the book is way better.

#3 Quistis

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 09:21 PM

I'm not sure if Lee Child writes mysteries or suspense, but there's always those books going in and out of the library. Also Vince Flynn, John Grisham. The mystery authors I've read are Janet Evanovich, Rita Mae Brown, Jo Dereske, Agatha Christie. Oooh, have you ever heard of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo series by Steig Larsson? Those are really good!

#4 Ikiosho

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 02:33 AM

H. P. Lovecraft. But he's not important. Just wrote the Cthulu mythos, created the eldritch horror, and inspired Stephen King is all.

#5 Wolf O'Donnell

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 04:41 AM

What do you mean by mystery fiction and how do you distinguish it from law fiction?

I've got a few suggestions, but they might not be what you're looking for.

Incompetence by Rob Grant is in essence a crime-thriller story set in a near-future federal Europe where you can't discriminate against someone because of their incompetence, resulting in a world filled with people that just aren't any good at their jobs. Except the serial killer is very good at his job and it's up to a physically unfit detective working for an unnamed secret agency to stop him. It's got a comedic flavour akin to Red Dwarf. In fact Rob Grant worked on Red Dwarf.

There's also Ben Aaronovitch's Rivers of London, known as Midnight Riot in the US. It's ubran fantasy story featuring a policeman drafted into the Metropolitan Police's magical division, who must hunt down what appears to be a supernatural serial killer.

#6 Twinrova

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 01:22 PM

Skip all that mystery stuff and go straight for A Song of Ice and Fire.

#7 Fin

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 01:47 PM

facebook indicates you should read austen.

#8 Ikiosho

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 07:18 PM

Logic indicates you should never read Austen.


Fix'd that for ya. ;)

Edit: DOUBLE FIX'D THAT FOR YOU

Edited by Ikiosho, 27 March 2012 - 09:47 PM.


#9 Fin

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 08:28 PM

you forgot to capitalise the a in austen. :(

#10 Crimson Lego

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:32 PM

Scratch all this. Hunger Games first. :drool:















Well actually, bio test first, but who cares.

#11 Ikiosho

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:38 PM

Oh, so you're going to jump on that bandwagon. :(

#12 Crimson Lego

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:40 PM

WHY AREN'T YOU ON THE BANDWAGON :rage:

#13 Ikiosho

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:43 PM

Because I have better things to do. I'm sure I could accumulate the entire plot of the entire series by asking a few questions in my english class.

#14 Selena

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:43 PM

Well, at least it's not Twilight.

#15 SteveT

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 09:57 PM

Mistborn.

#16 frogmonkeys

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 02:25 AM

I second the mistborn trilogy!! I love Brandon Sanderson!

#17 Fin

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 03:17 AM


Logic indicates you should never read Austen.


Fix'd that for ya. ;)

Edit: DOUBLE FIX'D THAT FOR YOU


aw hell, i just noticed the never in there. y u no like austen :(

#18 Crimson Lego

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:31 AM

Because I have better things to do. I'm sure I could accumulate the entire plot of the entire series by asking a few questions in my english class.


...Understandable. I'll probably wait until after the bio test before I read the book or watch the movie, though. Academics first! :honor:

#19 Stew

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 12:53 PM

You can probably pick up The Complete Sherlock Holmes from a library or get the penguin version from Chapters for a little under 30 bucks. Short stories are fantastic for quick reads and the novels are absurdly good mysteries.

A nd Then There Were None by Agatha Christie and The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris are both stellar as well, if you just want one novel.



The Hunger Games is pretty good too.

#20 Showsni

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 01:11 PM

Agatha Christie is always a safe bet. (Well, nearly always. I'm not so fond of some of the Tommy and Tuppence stuff... Probably because I'm not familiar with the authors she's imitating).

The Hunger Games isn't particularly mysterious...

HOw about you read Fire and Hemlock? That's pretty mysterious!


#21 Crimson Lego

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 03:00 PM

Yeah, we read And Then There Were None in Grade 9; so trippy. :o



Later, I downloaded and read Murder on the Orient Express, which wasn't as interesting. I found it a lot harder to visualize the actual setting of the story within a train rather than on an island. Might try out Sherlock Holmes, though.

#22 Ikiosho

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:24 PM



Logic indicates you should never read Austen.


Fix'd that for ya. ;)

Edit: DOUBLE FIX'D THAT FOR YOU


aw hell, i just noticed the never in there. y u no like austen :(


because bad. Pride and Prejudice bores the hell out of me. :P

Also, Lovecraft's works were mostly short stories. Also, Sherlock, as Stu mentioned.

#23 Wolf O'Donnell

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 04:51 AM




Logic indicates you should never read Austen.


Fix'd that for ya. ;)

Edit: DOUBLE FIX'D THAT FOR YOU


aw hell, i just noticed the never in there. y u no like austen :(


because bad. Pride and Prejudice bores the hell out of me. :P

Also, Lovecraft's works were mostly short stories. Also, Sherlock, as Stu mentioned.


In that case, it's probably best if you read Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.

#24 Crimson Lego

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 12:58 PM

Changed my mind, the ending of Mockingjay, the 3rd book, sucks.

#25 Showsni

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 02:57 PM

If you find islands easier to visualise than trains, then I guess... Evil Under the Sun is an Agatha Christie set on an island.

What about trains is hard to visualise, though? I guess you don't get many of the old fashioned compartment kinds nowadays...