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Possible Higgs boson sighting


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#1 Crimson Lego

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 05:26 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...onment-16074411


A respected scientist from the Cern particle physics laboratory has told the BBC he expects to see "the first glimpse" of the Higgs boson next week.

It comes as the search for the mysterious fundamental particle reaches its endgame.

If so, this will be a significant milestone for teams at the famous Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

The particle-accelerating machine on the French-Swiss border was built with the hunt for the Higgs as a key goal.

The collider smashes beams of protons together in head-on collisions, with signs of the Higgs boson, perhaps, in the debris.

The Higgs boson is notoriously difficult to define, but its existence helps us to understand why particles have mass.

The search for the Higgs has become the hottest pursuit in modern physics. It is separate from the unexpected announcement in September of the apparently faster-than-light neutrinos, a result which is still puzzling the world of physics, and has taken the limelight recently.

...


Concidentially, I did an in-class response to this last week; hopefully, all that time spent looking for it won't go to waste.

#2 Egann

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 11:25 PM

UPDATE: Hints at "God particle."

One of the big mysteries that physicists hope to plumb with the Higgs is an idea called supersymmetry. The Standard Model predicts a wide range of particles, of which the Higgs is the last to be pinned down. But with supersymmetry, each of the conventional elementary particles in the standard model, including the Higgs, has a companion. If there's only one Higgs boson, it's part of the Standard Model. But with supersymmetry, there have to be at least five Higgs bosons. Supersymmetry would double the number of particles to resolve physics problems in a similar way that the prediction--and later discovery--of antimatter did decades ago.



#3 arunma

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 10:36 PM

So yeah, CERN had their update on the Higgs the other day. The way high energy physics works, the longer you collect data, the stronger the signal appears above the background. Usually they (somewhat arbitrarily) say that four to five standard deviations above background is required to claim detection. By combining results from two different experiments (yes, because of the way statistics work you can put two data sets together and lower the error bars), they got two standard deviations, which corresponds to a 95% confidence level. It means that if they take more data, they're very likely to get a publishable result. Cool, huh?

That said, this seems to have gotten unmerited attention among the general public because of the name "God particle." I wonder what everyone would think if they knew that it's only called this because the person who reviewed Peter Higgs' paper on the topic wouldn't have accepted his nickname of "God Damned Particle."

#4 Egann

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 11:35 PM

No, I'm actually interested in the Higgs boson because I have a sci-fi story I'm working on which uses it. Unfortunately, I've never had anyone explain to me how the Higgs boson works, so I'm probably butchering the physics and will continue to do so until we actually know more about the thing.

#5 Crimson Lego

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 03:14 PM

Well...


http://www.bbc.co.uk...=PublicRSS20-sa



Cern scientists reporting from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have claimed the discovery of a new particle consistent with the Higgs boson.
The particle has been the subject of a 45-year hunt to explain how matter attains its mass.
Both of the Higgs boson-hunting experiments at the LHC see a level of certainty in their data worthy of a "discovery".
More work will be needed to be certain that what they see is a Higgs, however.
The results announced at Cern (European Organization for Nuclear Research), home of the LHC in Geneva, were met with loud applause and cheering.
Prof Peter Higgs, after whom the particle is named, wiped a tear from his eye as the teams finished their presentations in the Cern auditorium.
"I would like to add my congratulations to everyone involved in this achievement," he added later.
"It's really an incredible thing that it's happened in my lifetime."
Prof Stephen Hawking joined in with an opinion on a topic often discussed in hushed tones.
"This is an important result and should earn Peter Higgs the Nobel Prize," he told BBC News.
"But it is a pity in a way because the great advances in physics have come from experiments that gave results we didn't expect."

....


Awesome, and good to know the billions of dollars were well spent, at least in the long term.

#6 Veteran

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 05:36 PM

From what I've picked up, which is very little, am I right in thinking the Higgs Boson is what 'sticks' quarks together inside protons and neutrons?

Or am I a scale out and it sticks protons and neutrons together (although I think that's a muon's job)? Or something else entirely?

#7 Selena

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 05:45 PM

I thought it was made of midichlorians.

#8 Toan

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 06:18 PM

From what I've picked up, which is very little, am I right in thinking the Higgs Boson is what 'sticks' quarks together inside protons and neutrons?

Or am I a scale out and it sticks protons and neutrons together (although I think that's a muon's job)? Or something else entirely?


I found this video (even if it's not brand new) to be pretty informative.



#9 Ikiosho

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 11:09 PM

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#10 arunma

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 08:41 PM

From what I've picked up, which is very little, am I right in thinking the Higgs Boson is what 'sticks' quarks together inside protons and neutrons?

Or am I a scale out and it sticks protons and neutrons together (although I think that's a muon's job)? Or something else entirely?


Vet, you're probably thinking of gluons. These are the gauge bosons which mediate the strong force between protons and neutrons inside of a nucleus. Ever wonder why protons in a nucleus don't simply repel one another? It's because the gluon-mediated strong force is considerably stronger than the electromagnetic force The Higgs, rather, is what gives matter (including protons, neutrons, and their constituents) the property that we call mass.

Incidentally, a muon is a second generation lepton. Think of it as the heavier cousin of the electron.

I found this video (even if it's not brand new) to be pretty informative.



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#11 Sir Deimos

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Posted 09 July 2012 - 09:01 PM

... That video was absolutely fascinating. o_o All at once I am overwhelmed with how awesome physics is, and completely grounded in the knowledge that I am not meant to 'do physics'.